Download our Quick Start Guide to Ethical Hacking

Download our Quick Start Guide to Ethical Hacking

Maybe you’ve wondered what ethical hacking actually is. Or maybe you’ve been thinking of attending a course and giving it a go yourself. Perhaps you’ve been meaning to engage a 3rd party specialist to conduct a series of ethical hacks on your network. Whatever the extent of your ethical hacking knowledge, the Foursys Quick Start Guide To Ethical Hacking is an invaluable guide to get you started. 

February 05 2015 | Published by Matt Ford | Blog Foursys News

Ethical Hacking: Java Hacking

Ethical Hacking: Java Hacking

In this video you’ll see how easy it is for hackers to clone a website and inject a Java exploit into it – and then direct unsuspecting victims to the infected clone website. The video demonstrates how victims launch their browser from an innocuous-looking phishing email and are directed to what they believe is a ‘normal’ website.

February 04 2015 | Published by Matt Ford | Blog

Ethical Hacking: DLL Hijacking

Ethical Hacking: DLL Hijacking

In his latest ethical hacking video, Matt Ford, sales engineer at Foursys, takes a look at DLL hijacking hacking. Watch this fascinating video to learn how hackers place malicious DLLs onto machines using email phishing techniques that persuade the user to open links which replace the real DLLs loaded by applications on the PC.

January 20 2015 | Published by Matt Ford | Blog

Man-in-the-middle news attack - December 2014

Man-in-the-middle news attack - December 2014

In a new series for the Foursys blog Matt Ford reviews the months headline grabbing cyber security news and offers insight and opinion on the current affairs you need to know if you're in the world of IT security. 

January 05 2015 | Published by Matt Ford | Blog Industry News

Security shocked into action?

Security shocked into action?

In recent months we have seen a shift in the world of IT Security. We are more than used to hearing about Microsoft vulnerabilities on their Windows OS, or within Internet Explorer, and many now see it as a running joke that MS products are inherently less secure than anything else. Other high profile applications such as those from Adobe, or pretty much anything Java related have also been knocked in the past and rightly so.

November 03 2014 | Published by Matt Ford | Blog